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Property Lets Farthing Corner (B and B)
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Property Description

Farthing Corner (B and B)

Home: 1023    
Sleeps up to: 7   (4 bedrooms)
Nearest beach: not nearby Notes: Families/Couples preferred
Not suitable for infants
Home description
The house is attractively decorated with the warmth and comfort of a true home. Cross the threshold under a metre-thick thatch into the beamed entrance hall, with large brick inglenook fireplace, and an antique table adorned with fresh flowers.

Farrow & Ball colours, Wilton carpet, antique rugs and furnishings, big comfortable beds, crisp, pretty, cotton bed linens, and feather duvets and pillows make for a wonderfully relaxing stay.
Salisbury West Tytherley area
A curious ‘one horse’ town, unique in Hampshire, Stockbridge has a straight main street backed by water meadows. Before the railways, Welsh cattlemen stopped here with their herds on their way to the great fairs at Farnham and Maidstone. On the north side of the High Street, opposite the town hall, is a charming Edwardian garage, although sadly it no longer sells fuel.

Stockbridge has several good antique shops and exceptional crafts and fishing shops. The trout-rich River Test flows through, under and alongside the broad main street. Fishing on the Test is strictly controlled at this point by two exclusive clubs, both with long waiting lists.

Stonehenge is perhaps the greatest mystery of the prehistoric world and is one of the wonders of the world - a monument of unique importance. The World Heritage Site is surrounded by the remains of ceremonial and domestic structures, many of them accessible by road or footpath. The great stone blocks of the main ring are truly massive (15-20ft/4.5-6m high and 26 tons), and it seems certain that the stones in the outer rings - rare bluestones from the Preseli Hills of west Wales - had to be transported over 200 miles. Stonehenge’s orientation on the rising and setting of the sun has always been one of its most remarkable features.

The New Forest has been a very special part of rural England ever since William the Conqueror set it aside as his private hunting ground over 900 years ago (so it’s not that ‘new’ these days!). To preserve the Forest against any threat to the wildlife he would be hunting (especially deer) he adopted all the rigorous hunting laws of the Saxons and introduced many of his own: Anyone who killed a deer would himself be killed. If he shot at a deer and missed, his hands were cut off; and anyone who disturbed a deer during the breeding season had his eyes put out.
Certain rights, some of them still in force, were granted to the Forest dwellers: pasturage, the right to graze livestock; turbage, the right to cut turf; estover, the right to cut wood for fires; pannage, the right to let pigs forage for food.
It’s now a wonderful place for walking, riding, or driving around. The wildlife is still free to wander as there are few fences, so expect wild ponies, cattle and pigs on the roadsides and in the villages.

This National Trust property, Mottisfont Abbey, is a country house converted from an Augustinian Priory set on the River Test. The walled garden has the national collection of old-fashioned and species roses and is truly stunning during the rose season. There are often open air theatre and summer events.

The Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop is worth a visit. The middle of three villages strung out along the valley of the Wallop Brook, a tributary of the Test, Middle Wallop became famous during the Battle of Britain, when the nearby airfield was the base for squadrons of Spitfires and Hurricanes. Many of the old buildings have been incorporated into the Museum of Army Flying. The museum is filled with one of the country’s finest historical collections of military kites, gliders, aeroplanes and helicopters as well as imaginative dioramas and static displays tracing the development of army flying from pre World War I to today.

The Hawk Conservancy Trust is a national, award-winning attraction with over 200 birds of prey, many native to the UK, but also from abroad, such as the Condor. Watch the flying displays and enjoy activities for all the family.

Broadlands, an 18th-century mansion and parklands is the former home of Lord Palmerston and Lord Mountbatten. Visit the Mountbatten Exhibition in the coachhouse. Enjoy the Romsey Show in September, Hampshire Craft Show in August and other events.

The Danebury Iron Age Hill Fort was home to about 300 people and is a fine example of a Celtic settlement. The earthworks, ditches and banks were excavated over a period of years to give us a detailed view of life more than 2,000 years ago. One of the finest Iron Age hill forts in Hampshire. Pleasant walks and fine views across attractive countryside.

The Clarendon Way is a 24 mile long distance walk linking two of the most celebrated and beautiful cathedral cities in England, Winchester and Salisbury. Part of the Way runs through Test Valley, just a mile north of West Tytherley, 11 miles into the walk from Salisbury.

Situated three miles east of Romsey, the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens & Arboretum has 160 acres of exotic trees, shrubs, bulbs and herbaceous plants. Open all year from 10.30am to 6pm.

Houghton Lodge Gardens and Hydroponicum is a haven of peace beside the tranquil beauty of the River Test. There are wonderful views from higher ground over the informal landscape surrounding the 18th century Cottage Ornee. Rare chalk cob walls enclose ancient espaliers, greenhouses and a herb garden.

Three miles north of Stockbridge, the Longstock Park Water Gardens are part of the John Lewis estate. Seven acres of woodland and water gardens, landscaped into ponds, stream and islands with flowers, ferns and aquatic plants.
How to get there
 Nearest Travel Links
Airport: Southampton 35
Railway: West Dean 3
Ferry: Portsmouth 50

Located between Salisbury and Winchester, Farthing Corner is in a tranquil village setting.

Activities near Salisbury
Great for:
Walking holidays
Cycling holidays
Rural / countryside retreats
Sports:
There is a golf course within 30 mins drive
Horse riding nearby
Fishing nearby
Facilities
Luxuries:DVD Player, Log fire, Internet access
General:TV, Central heating, Telephone
Standard:Iron
Utilities:
Rooms:Bedrooms (4), Bathrooms (3), Ensuite (2), Shower rooms (1), WCs (4)
Furniture:Single beds (3), Double beds (2), Dining seating for 8, Lounge seating for 6, Sleeps maximum of 7
Other:Linen provided, Towels provided
Outdoors:Balcony / Terrace, Parking space, Private garden
Access: Secure parking
Further details indoors:
The relaxing sitting room has a comfortable sofa and armchairs set around an inglenook fireplace with wood-burning stove, and a pianola to play. There is also a television (with Freeview) and a video/DVD player if you fancy watching a film curled up by the fire.

The large kitchen has an Aga and from the large refectory table there are views onto both the gardens at the front and the woodland garden at the rear where you will often see deer and other wildlife, or wild ducks on the pond.
Further details outdoors:
The house has a few acres of woodland, dotted with lovely flowering cherry trees, carpets of snowdrops, spring flowers and a bluebell wood. To the front and side of the house are a lawn (perfect for croquet) and gardens, a vegetable plot (many of which are served for the delicious, home-cooked meals), and a fruit orchard.

The gravel driveway and secluded parking are particularly ideal if you have a classic car.
Further details
Liz has lived at Farthing Corner since 1985 and has lovingly tended and improved the house and gardens over that time. The woodland is enchanting during an afternoon stroll or to enjoy the birdsong in the morning.

Breakfasts are a memorable occasion, with home-produced eggs from our hens, sausage and bacon, as part of your cooked breakfast, freshly baked croissants, numerous home-made jams and marmalades, and porridge.

Evening meals are also available. Enjoy local produce, usually home-grown, as part of a delicious home-cooked meal. £15 per person for two courses.

On arrival we offer a complimentary cup of tea and warm, home-made scones or slice of cake from the Aga, which can be taken in the garden, or by the fire in cooler weather. We also offer a full afternoon tea with a selection of teas, dainty sandwiches, home-made cake and scones with strawberry jam and cream for £6 per person.

Evening meals and full afternoon tea must be ordered at least 24 hours in advance of your stay please.
Conditions
Please note: This is a B&B and not a self-caterinf rental property. All prices are per night.
Property Tariffs
Prices listed are per property per week
Quoted in Approx equivalent Approx equivalent Approx equivalent
British £ Euro € American $ Australian $
Double ensuite room 560 632 735 996
Twin room 490 553 643 872
Single room 250 282 328 445
Log cabin 560 632 735 996

Note: Prices may be subject to change at the owner's discretion.


Check-in is strictly after 4pm and please check out by 10.30am.

Property Availability
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Property Map
The Central Southern England region


The Test Valley is one of the best kept secrets in Hampshire, nestled between Winchester, Salisbury and the New Forest. The area is characterised by its wonderful countryside and attractive, quintessentially English villages, the famous River Test and bustling market towns of Andover, Stockbridge and Romsey. The varied landscape and gentle climate of the area creates a relaxed all year round location for exploring the history and heritage of Southern England.
Salisbury

One of England’s most historic cities is particularly known for its cathedral, one of the most beautiful buildings in the world. The spire rises 404ft and is the tallest in England. It is home to one of the four surviving originals of the Magna Carta (dating from 1215), and priceless other treasures. The city has some good museums, shops and a twice-weekly market.

Nearby is Salisbury Racecourse for flat racing, and Old Sarum, the site of the ancient city dating from the Iron Age.
Winchester

The ancient capital of England and Wessex, this beautiful historic city is lovely place to visit. It has an amazing Norman cathedral, which has the longest nave in Europe, containing the tombs of King Canute, Kind William (Rufus) II, and Jane Austen, among others. Wander along the high street and admire the 15th century Buttercross.
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